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BUILD IT Express

A short version of the Bellevue University Information Literacy Development Interactive Tutorial aka BUILD IT

WHAT ABOUT THE INTERNET?

Surveys show that the vast majority of people use the Internet for their information searches. You probably do too. So what's wrong with that? You can find just about everything on the Internet, can't you? EXACTLY! In fact, that is the problem. No one owns the web, no one organizes the web, or checks the accuracy of all the information on the web. However,

You might also retrieve good, useful, reliable information, if you know where and how to look.

FINDING INFORMATION ONLINE

SETTING UP AN INTERNET SEARCH

Google is the search engine most people are familiar with and a good place to start your web searching. The keywords you choose and how you arrange them in the search box will determine if your search is frustrating or rewarding. Though the following tips come from Google, they would apply to most search engines:

PUTTING YOUR WEBSITE TO THE TEST

Now that you have found some information on a website that you would like to use, how do you know if it is a reliable source?  You should put it to the CRAAP Test, developed by Meriam Library at California State University, Chico. The questions that apply to web information are listed below, but the CRAAP Test can be used for all your sources.  See the full CRAAP Test here. 

SO, i HAVE ALL MY SOURCES, NOW WHAT?

Make sure sources fit your topic and provide good support for it.

Just because your material came from the library, doesn't mean it is a good source for your paper. Keep in mind that articles found in library databases come from a wide range of publications. Consider the source before using it. Don't forget, you can,and probably should, limit your search to scholarly journals.

Once you are satisfied with all your research materials, the next step is CITING YOUR SOURCES.